5 Hip Mobility Exercises For More Athletic Movement

Hip Mobility Exercises

Do you have a job, a car, and a couch? Of course you do! Chances are your hip mobility is not as optimal as it could be! Thats ok! In this article I am going to teach you 5 mobility exercises for more athletic movement and healthier hips.

Our modern lives and lack of daily movement contribute to our poor hip mobility! Many of us lack the understanding of what to do to achieve better hip function and health. Thats why I wrote this article and made this video series. The goal is to give you some direction of what to do and how to do it. After reading this and trying the exercises you still feel like you need more direction please check out our online training program the everyday hip plan 2.0. The link is below.

The EVERYDAY HIP Plan 2.0

The good news is you’re in good company. Most everyone we work with is in the same boat. Tight hips run in our human family, but incorporating some basic movement and mobility drills into your daily routine can have a big positive effect on your overall health and quality of life. At premier fitness systems we are all about helping people find their flow! Thats what we call a great workout. It leaves you feeling better then when you walked in and doesn’t beat your down like most other fitness routines.

Working with all types of people from pro athletes to the general population and seeing the same issues has led us on this journey to figure out the best way to help people feel better. And better hip mobility is a great area to address. The hips are connected to everything we do and our a big reason for many peoples back issues and pain. I have experienced this first hand! I was told 5 years ago I needed back surgery. This motivated me to dive into back health research. I read everything I could get my hands on. I will leave this for another blog post but the short version of the story is I now feel the best I have ever felt and at 38 am doing some pretty cool stuff! A huge part of this for me was addressing my limited hip mobility and function. Another aspect for me was addressing my breathing. Below is a link to a cool article written by Dr. Michael Kay. Check it out.

If you really feel like geeking out on health and performance functionality check out this article by Dr. Kay our physical therapist at PFS.

Better Performance with Breathing 

Back to the hips!

A major focus of our training is restoring hip function and hip mobility. Because restricted hip mobility causes issues like lower back pain, knee problems… and it makes it really hard to do the things you want to do in the gym!

Your hips are the workhorses of your body! Think of all the steps you take during the day and now think of how the hips have to stabilize your every movement. So it’s no wonder tight hips mean trouble!

As your hips become more open and healthy your ability to create power, develop strength, and express your athleticism becomes better. Now you can do what you want to do and do it without feeling restricted.

This is a good thing!

I made this mobility series below with the help of Greg that gives you 5 hip mobility exercises you can incorporate into your weekly routine. It’ll help loosen your hips, increase your strength, and increase your performance in virtually everything you do.

Give it a try and let us know what you think!

Loosen Up Your Hips With This Routine

It’s almost impossible to exaggerate how important your hips are for your overall health and function! Try walking without moving your hips! This is why moving your hips should be a daily thing. Move a lot everyday in a lot of different ways. This is a key for overall health and longevity not to mention a huge variable for overall performance.

hip mobility training program

That’s why hip mobility and strength work is in every session we have with athletes and non athletes! Its foundational! Because if you want to get stronger and move better, you have to start with the hips!

Every day Hip plan 2.0
Thoughts on squatting and why we use a heel elevated position.
-
First the squat from a respiratory perspective. In normal breathing mechanics during a inhale a few things should happen.
• the thoracic diaphragm descends
• isa widens (bucket handle)
• pump handle increases
• posterior thorax expansion
• entire spine relative kyphosis
• scapula and ilium move away from each other
• sacrum counter-nutates
• pelvic diaphragm descends
During a exhale the opposite should occur.
-
This doesn’t typically happen!
This is why understanding breathing mechanics can be so powerful. It will tell us a lot about a person and give us some objective insights into how they might move.
-
The ability to descend to the bottom of a squat requires the pelvic floor to descend, counter-nutation of the sacrum. By changing the environment (heels up) and adding a front reach or front loaded weight we may be putting ourselves in a more optimal position to load and feel the right things. This is accomplished by respecting the position of the skeleton (rib cage and pelvis).
-
Try it and see what you feel 🤔
-
If you feel quads, glutes, and not low back stress I would say we are on to something. There are different squats for different people and contexts. But it would be hard to argue that feeling the right things while minimizing feeling the wrong things is a bad thing.
-
Ok back to the heels and my perspective. A while ago I would have looked at this as a cheat! But now I don’t. I have decent ankle mobility. I can pistol no problem but even I feel better with the heels elevated and especially while under load. This is probably because it makes it easier to manage my pelvis.
-
If you agree a squat should be a vertical movement then we need the pelvis to achieve a posterior orientation and sacral counter-nutation to achieve depth in a squat.
-
We might have a hard time achieving depth and controlling our pelvis because we have shifted our mass forward. When this happens we will have an anteriorly oriented pelvis and the ankle flexors will be driven short. Making it hard to achieve depth. The heel up position can help with this.
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#squats #squat #squattechnique #strengthcoach #strengthan
Thoughts on squatting and why we use a heel elevated position. - First the squat from a respiratory perspective. In normal breathing mechanics during a inhale a few things should happen. • the thoracic diaphragm descends • isa widens (bucket handle) • pump handle increases • posterior thorax expansion • entire spine relative kyphosis • scapula and ilium move away from each other • sacrum counter-nutates • pelvic diaphragm descends During a exhale the opposite should occur. - This doesn’t typically happen! This is why understanding breathing mechanics can be so powerful. It will tell us a lot about a person and give us some objective insights into how they might move. - The ability to descend to the bottom of a squat requires the pelvic floor to descend, counter-nutation of the sacrum. By changing the environment (heels up) and adding a front reach or front loaded weight we may be putting ourselves in a more optimal position to load and feel the right things. This is accomplished by respecting the position of the skeleton (rib cage and pelvis). - Try it and see what you feel 🤔 - If you feel quads, glutes, and not low back stress I would say we are on to something. There are different squats for different people and contexts. But it would be hard to argue that feeling the right things while minimizing feeling the wrong things is a bad thing. - Ok back to the heels and my perspective. A while ago I would have looked at this as a cheat! But now I don’t. I have decent ankle mobility. I can pistol no problem but even I feel better with the heels elevated and especially while under load. This is probably because it makes it easier to manage my pelvis. - If you agree a squat should be a vertical movement then we need the pelvis to achieve a posterior orientation and sacral counter-nutation to achieve depth in a squat. - We might have a hard time achieving depth and controlling our pelvis because we have shifted our mass forward. When this happens we will have an anteriorly oriented pelvis and the ankle flexors will be driven short. Making it hard to achieve depth. The heel up position can help with this. • • • • #squats #squat #squattechnique #strengthcoach #strengthan

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